Below are examples of my favorite Young Adult (YA) works:


Finding Nemo, a Disney Pixar Story

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Finding Nemo, by Gail Herman

Join Marlin, a brave clownfish, who must embark on an amazing journey across the ocean to find his son, Nemo. – Amazon

The Terrible Two, by Marc Barnett and Jory John

BookList Review:

Miles Murphy was the most notorious prankster at his old school. But his new school, in the sleepy town of Yawnee Valley, already has an accomplished prankster, and Miles will need to pull off an epic prank to compete. Miles has a challenge ahead, as the principal suspects he is a troublemaker, and the school bully is targeting him. With two main characters named Miles and Niles, it would have been easy for a listener to be confused, but due to Verner’s careful but unobtrusive enunciation, it is always clear whether it is Miles or Niles who is being referenced. Despite the name similarity, Verner differentiates the classmates by giving Niles a slightly higher and more precise voice, in contrast to Miles’ laid-back voice. He narrates humor well, from the self-importance of Principal Barkin practicing his power speech to the eagerness of that kid in class who repeats the obvious loudly and enthusiastically. Verner is particularly good at conveying tension between characters during their dialogues, which suits the prank war that ensues. He is equally adept with a deadpan, humorous reading of the many cow facts and pranking timetables in the story. The authors craft a clever comedy, and the narrator brings it to life. This would be perfect for Wimpy Kid lovers and Gordon Korman fans alike.

— Amanda Blau

The Terrible Two, by Mac Barnett

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The Thief of Always, by Clive Barker
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The Thief of Always, by Clive Barker

Publisher’s Weekly:

When a 10-year-old boy wishes to be delivered from a boring afternoon, a creature takes him to the Holiday House. “Barker masterfully embroiders this fantasy world with a mounting number of grim, even gruesome details,” wrote PW, “in a tale that manages to be both cute and horrifying.” Ages 10-up.
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